Root Knot Nematodes

Root Knot Nematodes Root Knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are parasitic microscopic worm-like animals that infest plant roots and interfere with the uptake of water and nutrients. Infected plants will appear stunted, they may wilt on hot days even though soil is moist, they may have chlorotic or light green leaves and usually have reduced yields.       The roots will have "knots" on them where the nematode has entered the plant, and the "knots" do not come off easily, as can be seen on this nematode infested potato.   [...]

By |2021-07-21T16:27:53-05:00July 21st, 2021|Disease, Fruit & Nuts, Plants, Vegetable Gardening|

Imported Fire Ant Control

Imported Fire Ant Control Face it, we have all had run-ins with Fire Ant mounds and the painful blisters that form after they bite. Children, pets, and wildlife are especially vulnerable, as they are often unaware of the mounds until the ants begin biting. There are several options for controlling (but unfortunately not eradicating) Imported Fire Ants: The Two Step Method: Step One involves broadcasting a fire ant bait over the entire area once or twice a year. This has the potential for reducing the colonies by 80-90%. Apply baits [...]

By |2021-05-19T09:45:30-05:00May 19th, 2021|Insects, Lawn Care, Vegetable Gardening|

Bacterial Leaf Spot on Peppers

Bacterial Leaf Spot on Peppers This devastating disease can infect peppers and tomatoes. Prevention is the key, as once the disease has taken hold treatment is not effective. Bacterial leaf spot causes lesions that look like they are soaked with water. The spots usually appear on the lower leaves first, and as the disease progresses the spots are purple brown with a light brown center. When the spots appear on the peppers, they cause spotting and raised cracks, which open the fruit up to infection by other disease organisms. There [...]

By |2021-05-12T14:59:23-05:00May 12th, 2021|Disease, Vegetable Gardening|

Tomato Leaf Curl

Tomato Leaf Curl Most gardeners have experienced leaf curl on tomatoes at one time or another. It is important to understand the cause so that you can make the decision on whether it is necessary to remove the plant from the garden or not. Some causes are environmental and may be attributed to physiological conditions. When this is the case, removal of the plant is unnecessary. Leaf Roll, aka Physiological Leaf Curl, is often seen during excessively moist, cool conditions. The leaf rolls “upward” and becomes leathery in texture. Curling [...]

By |2021-05-12T14:59:47-05:00May 12th, 2021|Disease, Vegetable Gardening|

Pepper Leaf Spot

Pepper Leaf Spot I know that I am not the only one who has had this disease on their peppers. It appears in the late spring to summer when we have had frequent rainfall. Of course, if you are overhead watering, you would see it as well. Bacterial leaf spot on peppers can be a devastating disease if not caught and treated early. This is why I always preach that your garden needs to be in sight of your house so that you can check it often. This disease is [...]

By |2021-05-12T15:01:13-05:00May 5th, 2021|Disease, Vegetable Gardening|

After the Freeze 2021

Freeze Damage to Plants I am sure everyone is anxious to know what damage the extreme cold temperatures have done to our landscapes. Unfortunately, it is too early to tell in most cases. You will hear me repeat this, I am certain, but “time will tell”. I know it is difficult to have patience, but because there are so many factors that can influence how a plant might be affected, that is exactly what we will have to do. Try to get used to the “ugly landscape”, as we really [...]

Determinate vs. Indeterminate Tomatoes

Determinate or Indeterminate Tomatoes When you come to Backbone Valley Nursery to peruse the many different varieties of tomatoes that we have to offer, you will see them labeled as “determinate” or “indeterminate”. What, exactly, does that mean? “Determinate” and “Indeterminate” classifications in tomatoes refers to their growth and flowering/fruiting habits, and can help you in your selection for different growing situations. “Determinate” type tomatoes flower and fruit until the very top of the plant produces flowers, then it stops growing any taller. All the fruit produced up until that [...]

By |2021-01-12T12:01:01-06:00January 12th, 2021|Vegetable Gardening|

January Vegetable Planting List

JANUARY VEGETABLE PLANTING Asian greens (seeds or transplants) Asparagus crowns Beets Broccoli (transplants) Brussels sprouts (transplants) Cabbage (transplants) Carrots Cauliflower (transplants) Swiss chard (seeds or transplants) Collards (seeds or transplants) Kale (seeds or transplants) Kohlrabi (seeds or transplants) Leeks (seeds or transplants) Lettuce (seeds or transplants) Mustard (seeds or transplants) Onion, bulbing (transplants) Peas, English, Snap or Snow Potato (late month) Radish Spinach (seeds or transplants) Turnips

By |2021-01-03T10:12:11-06:00January 3rd, 2021|Vegetable Gardening|

Elbon Rye as a Cover Crop

Why Plant “Cover Crops”? I am sure that many of you have heard that it is good to plant a winter “cover crop” in unused areas of the garden. But do you know exactly what the benefits are? *One of the most beneficial reasons is that it gives you a chance to add valuable, inexpensive organic matter to the soil. Elbon (or Cereal) Rye is one of the best “green manure” cops for capturing nitrogen and returning it to the soil in the spring. (Do NOT confuse this with Annual [...]

By |2020-12-02T08:28:55-06:00September 27th, 2020|Insects, Vegetable Gardening|

Grow Spinach from Seed in the Garden

Growing Spinach from Seed             What are the secrets for growing spinach from seed successfully? Because many people have difficulty getting the seeds to germinate, I thought I would give a few helpful hints on getting the seed started, and helping the plants grow well once they are up. -Prepare soil with liberal amounts of organic matter. Incorporate fertilizer such as Happy Frog Tomato and Vegetable Fertilizer or Happy Frog Marine Cuisine prior to planting. -If your soil is heavy or tends to hold moisture for prolonged periods, plant in [...]

By |2020-12-02T08:28:55-06:00September 26th, 2020|Vegetable Gardening|

Soil Solarization

There are few things that we can do in the garden when it is 105°F outside, but there is ONE thing that we can do BEST when it is this hot. Soil solarization is a method that is used to kill weeds seeds, insects and disease that are in the soil prior to planting. The goal is to heat the top six inches of the soil to a temperature between 110° and 125°F for four to six weeks. These high temperatures are enough to kill most annual and perennial weed [...]

By |2020-12-02T08:28:56-06:00August 15th, 2020|Disease, Insects, Vegetable Gardening|

Tomato Tips

If you missed our Tomato Tips Seminar, I am happy to share the information here for you. Of course, we go over the information in more depth at the seminar, but here it is in a "nutshell"! Tomato Tips Timing: Plant as early as possible in Central Texas. Buy your transplants in February and transplant them to 1-gallon pots which you can move in and out according to the temperature. Tomatoes will not do well below 55 degrees but can be set out in the sun during the warmer days [...]

By |2020-12-02T09:44:06-06:00February 25th, 2020|Vegetable Gardening|
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