Texas Ranger

July is the perfect time to look around your neighborhood and see what is thriving in this oppressive Central Texas heat. If you have been thinking about planting in a new area, adding screening or simply rejuvenating an existing landscape, observing what does well at the hottest time of the year should give you some great ideas of what will thrive in years to come. Texas Ranger, also known as Texas Sage, Cenizo, or Barometer Bush, has been giving us a particularly good show the past week. Abundant flowers appear [...]

By |2018-07-04T21:12:39+00:00July 4th, 2018|Plants|

Vines for Central Texas

Vines are used for many different purposes in the landscape. We might want to cover a fence to provide a screen, attract hummingbirds with a flowering vine, or just provide aesthetic appeal. Fortunately, we have a plethora of vines to choose from. Some things to consider before choosing a vine are its mature size, whether it requires sun or shade, if it is an annual or perennial, evergreen, deciduous, herbaceous, whether it climbs using tendrils, “holdfasts” by twining, and what attributes it can contribute to the landscape. CLICK HERE for [...]

By |2018-06-25T12:13:16+00:00June 25th, 2018|Plants|

Pruning Blackberries

One of the most common questions I am asked is “How do I prune my blackberries?” That is a very relevant question, however, it is usually asked at the WRONG time of the year! So I have decided to take the “mystery” out of pruning blackberries! There are a few simple facts you will need to know before pruning your blackberries. Blackberries are unique in that they have perennial roots and biennial tops. The tops (canes) live for two years, then die! Blackberries have two kinds of canes: *Primocanes: these [...]

By |2018-06-17T17:03:49+00:00June 17th, 2018|Plants|

My Crape Myrtles Aren’t Blooming!

Every year I get several inquiries about why someone’s Crape Myrtle is not blooming. There are several conditions that might affect a Crape Myrtle’s bloom period. Read the causes below to help figure out why yours don’t bloom. *Different varieties begin blooming at different times. Natchez (white) is usually one of the first to begin blooming. Some varieties may not begin blooming until late June. *Crape Myrtles require at least 8 hours of direct sun to bloom. If your Crape Myrtle receives too much shade, it will not bloom. *Insects [...]

By |2018-06-13T21:52:00+00:00June 13th, 2018|Trees|

Blossom-End Rot

If you have ever had the “blossom end” of a tomato turn black, you have experienced “blossom-end rot”. Caused by cultural conditions, and NOT disease, this malady can affect tomatoes, peppers, squash, watermelon and eggplant. Researchers agree that it is caused by a calcium deficiency in the blossom end of the fruit (yes, these are technically fruits, as they are actually formed from the ovary of a flower!) Now, why there is a deficiency is the real question, as Central Texas soils and water supplies are seldom deficient in calcium. [...]

By |2018-06-13T21:15:57+00:00June 13th, 2018|Uncategorized|

Grapes for Central Texas

Backyard grape growing has become very popular in recent years in Central Texas. Both table grapes and grapes for producing wine are available to the homeowner. I am a jelly-maker, and have enjoyed Black Spanish Grapes for my jelly-making endeavors in the past. It truly makes a very flavorful jelly! Here are the grapes we have available this year for you to grow: ‘Blanc duBois’ is a white table grape which grows on a vigorous vine. The grape clusters are medium-sized and ripen in June to July in Central Texas. [...]

By |2018-06-05T22:26:08+00:00June 5th, 2018|Fruit & Nuts|

Lacebug

There are many species of Lacebugs that can become abundant on certain host plants in certain years. (Do not confuse these with “LaceWINGS”, which are bright green, winged beneficial insects. Lacewing larvae eat aphids!) This year we have seen the destructive pest, Lacebug, on Texas Persimmon, Lantana and Elm trees. Watch for them on Azalea, Texas Sage, Pyracantha, Redbud, Bur Oak and Sycamore as well. Adult lace bugs are 1/8” to ¼” long and appear flattened. The wings are lace-like, and appear clear. Usually a plant infested with Lacebugs will [...]

By |2018-06-05T22:22:12+00:00June 5th, 2018|Insects|

Pecan Caterpillars

It happens every year. Pecan tree leaves just are tasty to many different caterpillars, and it is inevitable that your trees will become dinner to one type of caterpillar or another at some time during the year. So, which one do you have, and how do you control them? Walnut Caterpillars usually appear in the fall in Central Texas. They are fairly large, up to an inch or longer, are dark colored with lines down their bodies. But, the real give-away is they are very fuzzy or actually hairy! They [...]

By |2018-06-05T18:12:58+00:00June 5th, 2018|Insects|

Bringing in the Butterflies!

Working in a nursery certainly has its advantages. When the butterflies are out in force, it is a show-stopping display! Most of you know that butterflies have less specific “nectar” plants for the adult butterflies and more specific “food” plants for the caterpillars. It is interesting that the adults will often scope out where to lay their eggs while they are feeding on nectar. For this reason, it is helpful to have some of the “food” plants nearby when planting your nectar garden. An example of a “food” plant for [...]

By |2018-05-29T12:07:30+00:00May 29th, 2018|Insects, Plants|

Grasshopper Control

As our weather becomes hotter and drier, grasshoppers will become plentiful. Studies have shown that they are more plentiful and more voracious feeders in hot, dry years. When we have cool, wet springs, they are affected by a naturally occurring fungal disease that can control the population a bit. Because we have little doubt that this summer will be hot and dry, NOW is the time to start control of these destructive insects with Nosema locustae, a single-celled microsporidium protozoan that is impregnated on wheat bran and broadcast in affected [...]

By |2018-05-23T20:03:49+00:00May 23rd, 2018|Insects|

Plumerias LOVE Texas!

Plumeria are best grown in pots here, as they require protection from temperatures below 33 degrees. Locate your Plumeria in a minimum of 6-8 hours of sun, with some shade from the afternoon sun, if necessary. A well-drained potting soil, such as Fox Farm Happy Frog potting soil, is a must for these plants. Their root systems will seem small for the size of plant, and repotting should be done only when the plants have filled their pots with roots. A 4”-6” jump in pot size is all that is [...]

By |2018-05-23T19:17:02+00:00May 23rd, 2018|Plants|

Daylily Culture in Central Texas

Growing up with Daylilies in Ohio, I remember appreciating their bright showy flowers everywhere. They were one of the many flowers I missed after moving to Texas 47 years ago. Now that I have a yard that is fenced-off from the deer, I can once again enjoy the day-long blooms of these beauties. Daylilies do best with full morning sun and full afternoon shade to dappled shade in the central Texas area. The morning sun helps the blooms to open. And, since each flower is open for only a day, [...]

By |2018-05-15T11:40:05+00:00May 15th, 2018|Plants|